Preparing for College Emotionally, Not Just Academically

This week we are going to share resources and advice from Child Mind Institute to help families support soon-to-be college students.
The first shares how problem-solving skills can help students keep from being overwhelmed. Topics include:
– College mental health skills
– Don’t try to “fix” every problem
– Practice mindfulness with your teen
– Help your child establish good self-care
– Work on planning and “coping ahead”
– Develop strategies for self-soothing
Hear how you can communicate, respond and help your teen below!

Preparing for College Emotionally, Not Just Academically

 

Teenagers: Risk-Taking During Reopening

From the Child Mind Institute, MSNBC anchor Stephanie Ruhle hosts a discussion between Dr. Harold Koplewicz and Social Worker Kathryn Lige.

Monday, August 10, 2020 at 4:30pm

The panelists outline the adolescent brain’s propensity for risk-taking and impulsivity and how those behaviors converge with the coronavirus, social isolation, and the gradual reopening of society, and how parents can empathize with their children while promoting safety.

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Video Shorts to Help Kids Control Anxiety

The Child Mind Institute launched a series of short videos to explore tools children can use to control their anxiety rather than letting it control them. Check them out here!
Nixie and Nimbo

Tips to Help Teens Emotionally Prepare for College

The Child Mind Institute states, “Adolescents making the transition from high school to college need not only academic skills to ace the classwork, and time-management skills to stay afloat, but emotional problem-solving skills to handle the challenges. As parents, we can’t shadow them in the freshman dorm, but we can help supply them, before they leave home, with a toolbox of skills and habits to use when they become stressed or overwhelmed.”

Tips to Help Teens Emotionally Prepare for College:
1) College mental health skills
2) Don’t try to ‘fix’ every problem
3) Practice mindfulness with your teen
4) Help your child establish good self-care
5) Work on planning and ‘coping ahead’
6) Develop Strategies for Self-Soothing

Preparing for College Emotionally, Not Just Academically

 

 

 

Preventing Parent Burnout

Preventing Parent Burnout

  • Make a list of your child’s core strengths
  • Recall fun and funny times
  • Practice simple acts of kindness
  • Smile when they walk in the room
  • Grow your empathy
  • Touch base, literally
  • Frame your frustration as a puzzle to be solved
  • Allow yourself to feel what you feel
  • Notice the bright spots
  • Monitor your reactions to their behavior
  • Connect with others
  • Don’t take your child’s behavior personally

To read the full article from the Child Mind Institute click here