Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Life of a Student Athlete-Tip of the Week: Regularly drinking alcohol before your teen brain is fully developed can impact impulse-control and the memory and learning areas of the brain.
 
Brain development is still occurring between the ages of 12-26 and scientific research has shown that binge-drinking or regularly drinking alcohol as a teen can result in irreversible brain change.
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Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Life of a Student Athlete- Tip of the Week: Be sure to cross train one or two days a week. Participate in another activity to avoid overuse injury and let your muscles repair.
 
Rest can be just as important to fitness as working out. Your body gets stronger during the rest period as it rebuilds itself from exercising, giving your muscles time to heal and also reducing the risk of injury. You can practice alternating between hard and easy workouts, involving cross-training and valuing your personal time.
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Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip: Stress can impact your ability to perform on and off the field

Stress can inhibit routine tasks such as interacting with others, focusing in school, sleeping, eating, and maintaining overall health. Use coping mechanisms to balance stress levels while also ensuring proper rest, recovery and relaxation. For some this may be reading a book, going for a walk, taking a nap, writing, etc.

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Life of a Student Athlete- Tip of the Week

Life of a Student Athlete- Tip of the Week: Signs of dehydration are: muscle fatigue/cramps, coordination decline, decrease in energy, and a reduction in athletic performance

To help prevent dehydration, consume three cups of liquids every 15-20 minutes during activity. Water is the best form of hydration but sports drinks with electrolytes should be used for prolonged exercise at or above 60 minutes long. Hydration can also come from foods such as grapefruit, watermelon, strawberries and cantaloupe.

 

Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip: Experts recommend 8-10 hours of sleep for teenagers

Teens need to get enough sleep every night to function best. They are more likely to do well on a test or play their best game with sufficient sleep. Tips for getting enough sleep: Go to bed at a consistent hour every night, exercise regularly, avoid drinking caffeine and unwind by keeping the lights low and shut off electronics.

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Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip: Prep for the game: eat well, sleep plenty and think positively

It is important not to stay up late the night before a game and not to sleep in either. Breakfast and lunch should contain foods high in protein along with carbohydrates. Remember, water and drinks high in electrolytes will help sustain your energy for the duration of the game. During the time before the game, try to use as little energy as possible and think about the best outcomes regardless of how tough your opponent may be.