Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip of the Week: It is difficult to reach peak performance and learn new information if under the influence of marijuana.

The effects of marijuana can remain in the body for up to several days and may negatively impact attention, motivation, memory and learning. It can also compromise judgment and affect many other skills necessary to be successful in sports.

Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip of the Week: Never increase your exercise intensity or the amount of weight lifted by a factor of 10% every 2 weeks

Be smart to avoid injury when training for your sport. Gradual increases in exercise intensity and amount of weight lifted will provide the best results. Progression is the key to the success of your workout.

Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip of the Week: Be sure to cross train one or two days a week. Participate in another activity to avoid overuse injury and let your muscles repair

Rest can be just as important to fitness as working out. Your body gets stronger during the rest period as it rebuilds itself from exercising, giving your muscles time to heal and also reducing the risk of injury. You can practice alternating between hard and easy workouts, involving cross-training and valuing your personal time.

Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip of the Week: The lungs are designed for breathing in oxygen, not substances delivered by a vaping device.

Lung damage occurs because the substance remains at the bottom of the lung. This impacts the total amount of oxygen your lungs can access, therefore impacting your athletic performance.

Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip of the Week: During playoff season it is the healthy teams that have a better chance for success

Be a leader and make your own choices. Set an example to your peers and choose to surround yourself with those making healthy choices. Show your leadership by choosing not to use drugs or alcohol.

Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip of the Week: Alcohol suppresses training hormones for up to 4 days. You may show up to practice but there will be little improvement or gains.

Many athletes tend to underestimate the way in which alcohol use, even a few drinks, can nullify your hard work by erasing the effects of your workouts, reducing your endurance and compromising your mental game. Alcohol affects your ability to learn new plays and strategies; it decreases your aptitude for muscle development and recovery and negatively impacts your nutrition and endurance.

Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip of the Week: Nicotine in one vaping pod is equivalent to the nicotine in one pack of cigarettes

Vaping marijuana or nicotine can cause respiratory problems and decrease aerobic capacity- it reduces athletic ability by interfering with lung function. It also causes shortness of breath 3 times more often than nonsmokers- nicotine narrows blood vessels and makes your heart work harder than it should.

Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip: Managing stress does not have to include the use of alcohol or drugs. The best way to handle stress is through healthy habits.

Exercise, healthy eating, sleeping well and maintaining close relationships are important in stress management. These key actions can help reduce stress levels and improve your quality of life. Quick fixes like drugs or alcohol may temporarily mask stress but the long-term effects are unhealthy.

Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip of the Week: Celebrate safely during the end of the sports season    

Make healthy choices and stay alcohol and drug-free to celebrate the end of your sports season. Plan a dinner out with friends and family, host a game or movie night or take an overnight trip to somewhere new. Take time to reflect on the season and prepare for your next sport or enjoy the off-season.

Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip of the Week: Complex carbohydrates for pre-game fuel equals better performance.

Your body needs energy to perform at its best, and you get that energy from glycogen. Glycogen acts as your body’s fuel source and is found in complex carbohydrates. Eat foods that are rich in starch—potatoes, pasta and rice. It’s extremely important that your body has time to digest the food so eat three hours before you compete to avoid cramping and fatigue during the competition.