Listeners Ask: Teens & Drinking and Anxiety vs. Intuition

Listen to this podcast episode from Lynn Lyons, Psychotherapist, Anxiety and Children​ that answers two listeners questions:

A mom discovers her 15 year old has been thinking of drinking to manage her stress. What are the conversations parents should be having with their teens around stress, substance abuse and peer pressure?

And another mom raised by an anxious parent is trying to break the cycle with her daughters. She asks Lynn how to know when the voices inside her head are generational patterns of worry repeating or intuitive warnings. How does anxiety filter the decisions we make and the information we receive?

Listen here!

5 Tips for Monitoring Your Teen to Help Prevent Underage Drinking

5 Tips for Monitoring Your Teen to Help Prevent Underage Drinking

  • Limit Access
    If you have alcohol in your home, keep track of it and lock it up
  • Network
    Get to know the parents of your pre/teen’s friends
  • Enforce Rules
    Enforce your rules consistently and tell your pre/teen what behavior you expect from them while they are out
  • Check in Often
    Ask your pre/teen where they will be and check in with other parents
  • Be Up and Be Ready
    Wait up and look for signs of use

To view more resources on youth alcohol prevention visit our website here

Alcohol and the Impact on the Teen Brain

The average age parents have conversations w/ their kids about alcohol is almost 10 yrs old.
It’s never too early to discuss how underage drinking can impact their developing brains🧠.
Check out Ask, Listen, Learn resources below!

How alcohol affects your kids’ brains (VIDEOS)

 

 

 

Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip: Alcohol suppresses training hormones for up to 4 days. You may show up to practice but there will be little improvement or gains

A few drinks can offset your hard work by erasing the effects of your workouts, reducing your endurance and compromising your mental game. Alcohol affects your ability to learn new plays and strategies; it decreases your aptitude for muscle development and recovery and negatively impacts your nutrition and endurance.

Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip of the Week: Just one night of binge drinking will erase 2 weeks of practice.

Binge drinking can be defined as consuming five drinks for males and four drinks for females in about two hours. You may show up to practice but you will not see any gains for two weeks. It will also take 96 hours to rebalance hormones and you will see an 11% decrease in your performance.

Alcohol and Developing Teen Brain

This brief video provides information from FCD prevention specialists about the impact of alcohol use on a developing teen brain. We encourage you to share this link as a prevention conversation starter with the adolescents in your life.

Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip of the Week: Alcohol suppresses training hormones for up to 4 days. You may show up to practice but there will be little improvement or gains.

Many athletes tend to underestimate the way in which alcohol use, even a few drinks, can nullify your hard work by erasing the effects of your workouts, reducing your endurance and compromising your mental game. Alcohol affects your ability to learn new plays and strategies; it decreases your aptitude for muscle development and recovery and negatively impacts your nutrition and endurance.

Answering Your Child’s Tough Questions About Alcohol

“As your child becomes curious about alcohol, he or she may turn to you for answers and advice. Use this opportunity to start an open, honest conversation about drinking. Because some questions can be difficult to answer, it is important to be prepared. The following are some common questions and answers about underage drinking.”

http://www.cascobaycan.org/cbcwp/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/answering-tough-questions_0.pdf

 

6 Ways to Prevent Teen Drinking

“Although alcohol use during the teen years is on a decline, it’s still a hot button issue. Alcohol is the most widely used substance during adolescence. By age 15 about 33 percent of teens have had at least 1 drink, and that number jumps up to 60 percent by age 18.”

1. Develop Stress Management Skills.
2. Monitor Friendships.
3. Create an Agreement.
4. Supervise Parties.
5. Teach Peer Pressure Skills.
6. Support Healthy Risk Taking.

To read the full article, including facts your teen should know about alcohol please click here.

From the Center for Motivation and Change: We all know that substance use disorders can exact a terrible emotional and physical toll on the person struggling. A person overusing substances can suffer lower quality of life, impaired functioning at work, school and in family roles, and financial, legal and health problems. What you may not realize is that a significant part of this pain is attributable to stigma, as people with substance problems are labeled all sorts of negative things (“liars,” “losers,” “junkies,” “addicts”) and are often judged to be immoral, full of character defects and somehow carelessly and even willfully deciding to use substances instead of prioritizing more valued things in life like relationships and productivity.

To read the full article click here.