Talking With Your Teen About Marijuana

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has released a substance use prevention campaign, “Talk. They Hear You” that helps parents and caregivers start talking to their children early about the dangers of alcohol and other drugs. Click on the link below to read about talking with your teen about marijuana.

Talk They Hear You Marijuana

Free Screening: LIKE- Documentary on Finding Balance in our Digital World

Join us Tuesday March 16 @ 6:30pm ET / 3:30pm PT for a virtual screening and panel of LIKE a Documentary about the impact of social media on our lives.

LIKE is a film-based education program exploring the impact of social media on our lives and the effects of technology on the brain. The goal of the film is to inspire us to self-regulate. Social media is a tool and social platforms are a place to connect, share, and care … but is that what’s really happening? We will be showing the film, which will promptly be followed by a panel discussion and include access to further resources and materials.
This free event is made possible with generous support from the Bradley Family Foundation and Casco Bay CAN. Hosted by Freeport Middle School and Freeport Community Services. View the details and register below!

 

 

Start Conversations to Help Kids With Saying No to Risky Behaviors

From the Foundation for Advancing Alcohol Responsibility and Ask, Listen, Learn: Parents: navigating the teenage years with our children can prove overwhelming. From academics and sports, to social media and technology, kids are faced with countless pressures and often times, risky situations. It’s important for parents to guide their teens, and their developing brains, through a healthy lifestyle. As kids become adults and go through changes and transitions, it’s important to keep having conversations.
Check out the short video in the link below!

 

 

The Anxiety Vaccine Pt. 2: What Parents Can Do Right Now

“As we face a mental health crisis alongside the pandemic that we really focus on the emotional management skills that we can teach our children. It’s an effective way to immunize them against emotional difficulties by talking about their emotions, raising their awareness of them, and parents modeling emotional literacy. Lynn discusses the commons trait that most anxious parents have in common in how they raise anxious kids.”

If you are worried about your children and anxiety, Lynn Lyons, Psychotherapist, Anxiety and Children​, provides helpful tips on how to help.

The Anxiety Vaccine Pt. 2: What Parents Can Do Right Now

 

The Teen Brain

Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip of the Week: To increase flexibility hold each stretch for at least 45 seconds


Hold each of your stretches for at least 45 seconds and repeat two to three times and remember to breathe through each. Stretching for this period of time will lengthen your muscles therefore increasing your range of motion. Additional benefits also include improved circulation, better posture, stress relief and enhanced coordination.

Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip: Using alcohol and marijuana shuts down 10-11 of the 13 geographic regions of the brain, reaction diminishes significantly.

Using alcohol and marijuana can cause significant negative effects on an individual. Marijuana impacts your coordination, resulting in decreased ability to move, react and stay balanced. The use of alcohol controls the brain in many ways and can result in difficulty walking, blurred vision, slurred speech, slowed reaction times and impaired memory. Think about these facts before using alcohol or marijuana.

10 Things Parents Can Do To Keep Their Kids Safe From Addiction

When prevention works, it is the only treatment that is 100% safe and effective. Families are front-and-center in successful prevention efforts.”
-Dr. Mark Gold, Addiction Psychiatrist and Professor, Washington University School of Medicine
Short video below featuring 10 Things Parents Can Do To Keep Keeps Safe!

 

 

Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip: Vaping isn’t considered safe for teens because their brain is still developing and can expose them to toxic substances and nicotine.

Exposure to nicotine and toxic substances in vaping devices can cause your breathing to become rapid and shallow, as well as increase heart rate and blood pressure.  The vapor can contain volatile organic compounds, flavoring such as diacetyl which is a chemical linked to a serious lung disease and heavy metals such as nickel, tin and lead. Nicotine use can also rewire the brain, which can impact your concentration, learning and impulse control.