Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip: Athletes who sleep at least 8 hours per night are 68% less likely to sustain an injury compared to those who get less sleep.

Lack of sleep impacts reaction times and performance and causes fatigue. Aim to sleep at least 8 hours per night to maximize muscle growth, repair and recovery. This will also help improve cognitive skills and concentration. All of these factors together can contribute to a lower rate of athletic injuries.

10 Questions Teens Ask About Drugs and Health

National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) researchers have set aside a Chat Day each year during National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week® to answer questions teens have about drugs and health. They’ve compiled teens’ 10 frequently asked questions (FAQ’s) from more than 118,000 queries they’ve received to help start a conversation about drugs and health. To view the FAQ’s click here

Mother and teen girl viewing online resources together.

 

Medication Management in College

Learn more from the Child Mind Institute about how your teen can successfully manage their medications in college. Topics highlighted include:

– Beginning Early
– Getting Organized
– Drinking and Medication
– Drugs and Dangers
– Parental Worries

Medication Management in College

 

Preparing for College Emotionally, Not Just Academically

This week we are going to share resources and advice from Child Mind Institute to help families support soon-to-be college students.
The first shares how problem-solving skills can help students keep from being overwhelmed. Topics include:
– College mental health skills
– Don’t try to “fix” every problem
– Practice mindfulness with your teen
– Help your child establish good self-care
– Work on planning and “coping ahead”
– Develop strategies for self-soothing
Hear how you can communicate, respond and help your teen below!

Preparing for College Emotionally, Not Just Academically

 

New Video! Communities Talk

Check out Casco Bay CAN’s new 1-minute video, “Communities Talk” featuring Freeport Middle School students and Coalition members. Learn how you can support youth to make healthy decisions about underage drinking prevention.

What to Do (and Not Do) When Children Are Anxious

Child Mind Institute’s What to Do (and Not Do) When Children Are Anxious
1. The goal isn’t to eliminate anxiety, but to help a child manage it
2. Don’t avoid things just because they make a child anxious
3. Express positive- but realistic- expectations
4. Respect their feelings, but don’t empower them
5. Don’t ask leading questions
6. Don’t reinforce the child’s fears

Learn more below!

What to Do (and Not Do) When Children Are Anxious

 

 

 

Student Intervention and Reintegration Program

The Student Intervention and Reintegration Program (SIRP) is an evidence-based program for Maine teens, ages 13 – 18, who may be experimenting with alcohol and other drugs, making questionable decisions, or engaging in risky behavior. The program empowers teens to make healthy decisions and reduce risk, all without judgment or shame.
This 12-hour educational program is a conversation, not a lecture, and is offered in small groups at many Maine high schools. Each class is taught by a nationally certified instructor. SIRP is one small step in the right direction, and, for many teens, will be the biggest step of their lives. The class provides teens with facts and teaches them to assess risks and make better, more informed choices in their lives.
To learn more about the program, visit the SIRP website here: https://sirpmaine.com/

National Prevention Week: Vaping Prevention

Today’s National Prevention Week theme is Preventing Youth Tobacco Use (E-Cigarettes and Vaping). Learn more about E-cigarette’s and vaping and how to start the conversation using our resource below!

Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip of the Week: Nicotine is addictive – 3 out of 4 teens who start using in high school will continue to use as adults

Vaping nicotine rewires the brain, which can impact your concentration, learning and impulse control. It reduces athletic ability to focus completely, slowing your reaction time. Nicotine also interferes with lung function – narrowing blood vessels and making your heart work harder than it should.