Start Conversations to Help Kids With Saying No to Risky Behaviors

From the Foundation for Advancing Alcohol Responsibility and Ask, Listen, Learn: Parents: navigating the teenage years with our children can prove overwhelming. From academics and sports, to social media and technology, kids are faced with countless pressures and often times, risky situations. It’s important for parents to guide their teens, and their developing brains, through a healthy lifestyle. As kids become adults and go through changes and transitions, it’s important to keep having conversations.
Check out the short video in the link below!

 

 

Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip: Alcohol suppresses training hormones for up to 4 days. You may show up to practice but there will be little improvement or gains

A few drinks can offset your hard work by erasing the effects of your workouts, reducing your endurance and compromising your mental game. Alcohol affects your ability to learn new plays and strategies; it decreases your aptitude for muscle development and recovery and negatively impacts your nutrition and endurance.

10 Things Parents Can Do To Keep Their Kids Safe From Addiction

When prevention works, it is the only treatment that is 100% safe and effective. Families are front-and-center in successful prevention efforts.”
-Dr. Mark Gold, Addiction Psychiatrist and Professor, Washington University School of Medicine
Short video below featuring 10 Things Parents Can Do To Keep Keeps Safe!

 

 

Talk Early, Talk Often and Keep Talking!

TALK EARLY, TALK OFTEN…KEEP TALKING!
Parents are the #1 influence in a child’s life.
It’s not too early to talk with your child to prevent youth substance use.

When to Talk
– In a car, you have a captive audience to provide short bits of information.
– When watching TV, address any illegal drug or alcohol use shown.
– During mealtimes, take time to speak with your child – research shows that children who have dinner with their families are less likely to drink alcohol or use illegal drugs.
What to say
– Preschool: “Vitamins are to keep us healthy, but only take what I give you.”
– Elementary School: “You should only take medicines that your doctor chooses for you – it’s dangerous to take someone else’s medicine and it could make you sick.”
– Middle School: “Alcohol and drugs can damage your brain and may stop you from being your best in school and in sports.”

Alcohol and Developing Teen Brain

This brief video provides information from FCD prevention specialists about the impact of alcohol use on a developing teen brain. We encourage you to share this link as a prevention conversation starter with the adolescents in your life.

Website With Resources From Birth to 19 Years Old!

We encourage you to check out Parenting Montana, which provides easy-to-use tools for children and teens of all ages, from birth to 19 years old! The website is well designed you can easily access various categories (listening, routines, tantrums, happiness, homework, back talk, stress, peer pressure, mixed messages about alcohol and more!) within each age listed.
 

Worried About a Friend?

Worried someone you know is using substances or might have a substance use disorder? Check out this infographic from SAMHSA about how to start a conversation. It isn’t always easy but these talking tips can help!

Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip of the Week: Alcohol suppresses training hormones for up to 4 days. You may show up to practice but there will be little improvement or gains.

Many athletes tend to underestimate the way in which alcohol use, even a few drinks, can nullify your hard work by erasing the effects of your workouts, reducing your endurance and compromising your mental game. Alcohol affects your ability to learn new plays and strategies; it decreases your aptitude for muscle development and recovery and negatively impacts your nutrition and endurance.