Study Finds 88% of Teens Who Abuse ADHD Drugs Use Someone Else’s Medication

A study from the University of Florida College of Public Health and and Health Professions and the College of Medicine found almost 90 percent of teens who abuse medications for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) say they used someone else’s medication.

The study included more than 11,000 American children and teens ages 10 to 18, who were interviewed between 2008 and 2011. This was published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence. Learn more here and read the journal article here.

Student Intervention and Reintegration Program (SIRP)

SIRP is an educational, risk-reduction program for high school aged youth who have had experiences with tobacco, alcohol or drugs, and who may not qualify for treatment. The primary goal of SIRP is to reduce or eliminate use of tobacco, alcohol, or drugs and associated problems, such as absenteeism, car crashes, fights, risky sexual behaviors, and health problems. SIRP helps participants plan for and commit to changes in their behavior.

Learn more about the SIRP Program offered in our service area here

March 2016 Tip of the Month

The quotes included in this months tip were given directly from middle school and high school students from our service area.

Tip of the Month March 2016

Connection between mental health and drug use

Learn more about the connection between drug addiction and mental health issues by visiting the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) website here

Quiz. Prevent Alcohol and Tobacco Use.

Take this 15-question quiz to examine the ways you address alcohol and tobacco use in your family, including how you talk about it and whether others are positive influences in preventing underage alcohol and tobacco use.

If you have more than one child, think about one of them while you’re taking the quiz. You might then repeat it for your other child or children.

Nonmedical Use of Adderall on the Rise Among Young Adults

Nonmedical use of Adderall, a medication used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), rose 67 percent among young adults between 2006 and 2011, a new study finds. The number of emergency room visits involving misuse of the drug among 18- to 25-year-olds also rose during this period, NPR reports. To read the full article click here.

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Inside the Teenage Brain

Inside the Teenage Brain” from PBS answers lots of questions you may have. View videos, hear interviews, look at studies with this helpful resource!