Alcohol and Marijuana Use by Southern California Adolescents Predicts Poor Academic Performance and Health Problems

According to the nonprofit RAND Corporation, a study that followed a group of students over a seven-year period, “Adolescents who use both marijuana and alcohol during middle school and high school are more likely to have poor academic performance and mental health during high school, according to a new study by the nonprofit RAND Corporation that followed a group of students over a seven-year period.

However, the study found marijuana use was predictive of poorer functioning across more areas, including lower academic functioning, being less prepared for school, more delinquent behavior and poorer mental health. The results are published online in the journal Addiction.”

Read the full study here

CDC Releases Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Report

Read the newly released Center’s for Disease Control and Prevention’s Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance (YRBSS) report. The CDC states that the YRBSS monitors six categories of priority health behaviors among youth and young adults: 1) behaviors that contribute to unintentional injuries and violence; 2) tobacco use; 3) alcohol and other drug use; 4) sexual behaviors related to unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection; 5) unhealthy dietary behaviors; and 6) physical inactivity. In addition, YRBSS monitors the prevalence of obesity and asthma and other priority health behaviors. YRBSS includes a national school-based Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) conducted by CDC and state and large urban school district school-based YRBSs conducted by state and local education and health agencies. This report summarizes results for 118 health behaviors plus obesity, overweight, and asthma from the 2015 national survey, 37 state surveys, and 19 large urban school district surveys conducted among students in grades 9–12.

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This week marks the beginning of National Prevention Week!
The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) hosts National Prevention Week each year during the third week of May, near the start of summer. Summer is a season filled with celebrations and recreational activities where substance use and abuse can happen, such as graduation parties, proms, weddings, sporting events, and outdoor activities. National Prevention Week is timed to allow schools to take part in a prevention-themed event before the school year ends, raising awareness in students of all ages. According to SAMHSA’s National Survey on Drug Use and Health (2004), percentages of marijuana, cigarette, and alcohol initiates among youth increase between spring (April and May) and summer (June and July), and the timing of National Prevention Week helps to educate young people and their families at this crucial time of year.

Washington Marijuana-Related Fatal Crashes Double After Legalization

The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety has issued a study showing that 10 percent of drivers involved in fatal crashes in Washington State had detectable amounts of THC in their systems. Between 2010 and 2014, 3,031 drivers in the state were killed in crashes and 303 of them turned out to be THC positive.
 
Access the traffic safety report here

Nonmedical Use of Adderall on the Rise Among Young Adults

Nonmedical use of Adderall, a medication used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), rose 67 percent among young adults between 2006 and 2011, a new study finds. The number of emergency room visits involving misuse of the drug among 18- to 25-year-olds also rose during this period, NPR reports. To read the full article click here.

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Inside the Teenage Brain

Inside the Teenage Brain” from PBS answers lots of questions you may have. View videos, hear interviews, look at studies with this helpful resource!