Decoding the Teenage Brain

The teenage years are “the last, great neuroplastic era in our lifetimes,” according to Steinberg, referring to the brain’s continued capacity for intellectual and emotional growth. The same emerging circuitry that makes teenagers vulnerable to risky behavior and mood swings also confers significant advantage on adolescent learners. To read the full article click here.

An Illustration of the Teenage Brain

 

How To Talk With Your Kids About Vaping

“Our comprehensive vaping guide will explain the culture of vaping, what the current research says (and doesn’t say), and how to approach difficult conversations about vaping or Juuling with your child. Download the guide now.”

How to Talk With Your Kids About Vaping [GUIDE]

 

New Discovery on the Brain’s Reward Pathway

“Substance use disorders are related to dysfunction in the brain’s motivational and reward processes, so understanding how the brain’s reward system works is key to finding new therapies.” Click here to read the full article from the National Institute on Drug Abuse

New high-resolution, non-invasive imaging techniques produce detailed diagrams of neural tracts, enabling new analyses of how
brain regions are connected. Credit: Washington University – University of Minnesota Human Connectome Project consortium

Resource Books at Local Libraries

Casco Bay CAN has donated books to our service area libraries: Falmouth Memorial Library, Freeport Community Library, Gray Public Library, New Gloucester Public Library, Merrill Memorial Library in Yarmouth and Prince Memorial Library in Cumberland. Check them out at your local library and view a listing here: Library Books Updated 2019

Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip: Nicotine in one vaping pod is equivalent to the nicotine in one pack of cigarettes


Vaping marijuana or nicotine can cause respiratory problems and decrease aerobic capacity- it reduces athletic ability by interfering with lung function. It also causes shortness of breath 3 times more often than nonsmokers- nicotine narrows blood vessels and makes your heart work harder than it should.

Talk Early, Talk Often and Keep Talking

TALK EARLY, TALK OFTEN…KEEP TALKING!
Parents are the #1 influence in a child’s life. It’s not too early to talk with your child to prevent youth substance use.
When to Talk:
– In a car, you have a captive audience to provide short bits of information.
– When watching TV, address any illegal drug or alcohol use shown.
– During mealtimes, take time to speak with your child – research shows that children who have dinner with their families are less likely to drink alcohol or use illegal drugs.
 
What to Say:
– Preschool: “Vitamins are to keep us healthy, but only take what I give you.”
– Elementary School: “You should only take medicines that your doctor chooses for you – it’s dangerous to take someone else’s medicine and it could make you sick.”
– Middle School: “Alcohol and drugs can damage your brain and may stop you from being your best in school and in sports.