From the Center for Motivation and Change: We all know that substance use disorders can exact a terrible emotional and physical toll on the person struggling. A person overusing substances can suffer lower quality of life, impaired functioning at work, school and in family roles, and financial, legal and health problems. What you may not realize is that a significant part of this pain is attributable to stigma, as people with substance problems are labeled all sorts of negative things (“liars,” “losers,” “junkies,” “addicts”) and are often judged to be immoral, full of character defects and somehow carelessly and even willfully deciding to use substances instead of prioritizing more valued things in life like relationships and productivity.

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Playing Sports May Protect From Childhood Trauma

Participation in team sports as a young person can significantly reduce the long-term likelihood of depression and anxiety for people with childhood trauma. Read the full article here.

Gray New Gloucester Project Sticker Shock

Students from Gray-New Gloucester High School collaborated with the Cumberland County Sheriff’s Office and Casco Bay CAN to visit local businesses and promote Project Sticker Shock, a national and state-wide program. The students volunteered to be a part of the project and bring awareness to the ramifications of purchasing alcohol for underage individuals by placing stickers on alcohol packs that include Maine laws about providing or purchasing alcohol for a minor. Volunteers wore t-shirts promoting their efforts and they presented participating businesses with a “thank you” recognition certificate for helping promote keeping youth safe and healthy. Project Sticker Shock was also implemented in surrounding communities served by Casco Bay CAN and is held twice a year, in the Spring during prom and graduation season and again in December during the holiday season.

Photo from left to right: Deputy Cole Chandler (School Resource Officer, CC Sheriff’s Office), Jenny Hall, Michelle Murley (School Social Worker) Jess Nimblett, Keegan Delaney, Emma Sinford, Gage Grindle, Morgan Stokes, Nick McCann, Joye Macrina, Connor Myatt, Renee Brichetto, Sabrina Fisher, Zoe Jewell, and Deputy Shaeffer (CCSO).

Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip: Celebrate safely during the end of the sports season

Make healthy choices and stay alcohol and drug-free to celebrate the end of your sports season. Plan a dinner out with friends and family, host a game or movie night or take an overnight trip to somewhere new. Take time to reflect on the season and prepare for your next sport or enjoy the off-season.

Responsible Beverage Server Training

Thank you to Officer Mike McManus of the Freeport Police Department and Mike Mack, Regional Juvenile Correctional Manager who provided a Responsible Beverage Server training to local restaurant employee’s last week. Thank you to the The Harraseeket Inn for hosting this community training!

Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip of the Week: Nicotine is addictive – 3 out of 4 teens who start using in high school will continue to use as adults

Vaping nicotine rewires the brain, which can impact your concentration, learning and impulse control. It reduces athletic ability to focus completely, slowing your reaction time. Nicotine also interferes with lung function – narrowing blood vessels and making your heart work harder than it should.

Video: Tips to Help Your Teen Celebrate Safely

The spring is a time for celebration with prom and graduation! In this new video, hear from local community members such as parents, coaches, principals and law enforcement about tips to help your teen celebrate safely.

Life of a Student Athlete: Tip of the Week

Tip: Regularly drinking alcohol before your teen brain is fully developed can impact impulse-control and the memory and learning areas of the brain.

Brain development is still occurring between the ages of 12-26 and scientific research has shown that binge-drinking or regularly drinking alcohol as a teen can result in irreversible brain change.